» Strength and Conditioning Stuff You Should Read: 3/27/20

» Strength and Conditioning Stuff You Should Read: 3/27/20

[ad_1]

Strength and Conditioning Stuff You Should Read: 3/27/20

Written on March 27, 2020 at 5:56 am, by Eric Cressey

It’s been several weeks since I published one of these recommended reading/listening lists; luckily (?), having both facilities closed has freed up some time to pull one together. Check these out:

Niched Podcast – My business partner, Pete Dupuis, just launched his own entrepreneurship podcast. The guests don’t all come from the fitness industry, but given Pete’s presence, he does an outstanding job of bringing the lessons back to relate to owning a gym or managing a clientele.

You Should Train Clients in Person Before Even Thinking About Online Coaching – With the surge in online training availability taking place right now, Dean Somerset highlights some crucial competencies that need to be in place on this front.

Chasing the Sun – I just finished up this book on the benefits of sunlight by Linda Geddes. It ties in nicely with Why We Sleep, by Dr. Matthew Walker, if you’ve already checked that out.

Top Tweet of the Week

Top Instagram Post of the Week

 

View this post on Instagram

 

This fantastic dissection image of the posterior rotator cuff has been making the rounds on Instagram, and rightfully so: it’s a great perspective. I’ll add my own spin on it: the long head of the triceps (LHOT) is the part that jumps out at me the most. It’s intimately linked with the posterior shoulder, as it attaches not only on the infraglenoid tubercle of the scapula (bone), but also blends with the joint capsule and labrum. This makes it an important posterior shoulder stability structure. Additionally, it’s not uncommon – particularly in an overhead throwing population – to see a Bennett’s lesion (extra bone formation on the inferior/posterior border of the glenoid) that creates a “speed bump” over which the rotator cuff has to go during the lay-back phase of throwing. Many of the brightest minds in the sports medicine world have asserted that this adaptation may at least in part arise because of the significant pull on the posterior shoulder by the long head of the triceps tendon, which is active eccentrically to prevent excessive elbow flexion during lay-back, not to mention its obvious significance at ball release. What are the take-home messages? Take care of the triceps; they need to be long and strong. And, don’t ever overlook the significance of the long head of the triceps in shoulder pain. #cspfamily #shoulderpain #armcare #sportsmedicine #Repost @dr.alvaromuratore @get_repost_easily #repost_easily ****** La zona posterior del manguito rotador contribuye a la elevación más rotación externa del hombro y además funciona como estabilizador de la articulación. En este video se observa desde atrás: El supraespinoso,infraespinoso, redondo menor y también el redondo mayor pasando por delante del tríceps. #shoulderanatomy #shouldertherapy #shouldersurgery #anatomy #anatomiadelhombro #anatomia #rehabilitation #rehab #phisicaltherapy #kinesiologist #kinesiologia #cirugiademano #cirugiadehombro #rotatorcuff #rotatorrehab #manguitorotador #mangorotador #manguitorotadores #sportsmedicine #orthopedics #orthopedicsurgery #orthopedicsurgeon

A post shared by Eric Cressey (@ericcressey) on

Sign-up Today for our FREE Newsletter and receive a four-part video series on how to deadlift!




[ad_2]

Source link

Please follow and like us: