How does HIIT affect your health?

How does HIIT affect your health

If you want to lose weight quickly, then HIIT is the perfect workout for you. It’s an intense form of cardio training that burns lots of calories. But how does HIIT affect your health?

Research has shown that HIIT is a great way to improve health and live a longer life. This type of exercise can help with many things, such as mental health, fat loss, sleep quality, and more! However, there are some risks associated with this type of workout. These include: overtraining (doing too much), injuries (such as stress fractures), and increased risk for depression or anxiety. These risks can be avoided by starting slow and building a healthy training habit.

Health Benefits of HIIT

HIIT is great for mental health!

HIIT boosts your mental health

HIIT has been shown to improve mental health, such as depression and anxiety.  A study in the European Journal of Applied Physiology looked at seven different studies on this topic. The conclusions showed that HIIT does have a positive effect on mental health. It also helps individuals who suffer from depression, anxiety, ADHD, and other disorders.

A study published in Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience looked at 15 different studies and concluded that high-intensity interval training improved cognitive functions such as attention and memory. The researchers believe that this is because HIIT increases blood flow to the brain, which can help boost cognitive functions.

HIIT improves sleep quality.

Another benefit of HIIT is improved sleep quality. A study published in the journal Sleep Medicine Reviews found that people who did HIIT had better quality sleep than those who didn’t do any cardio. They also reported feeling less tired during the day. Another study published in the International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity found that doing two rounds of 30 seconds of high-intensity interval training before bedtime could improve sleep quality.

In a study published in the International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, researchers discovered that people who did HIIT before bedtime reported better sleep quality than people who didn’t do any exercise at all.

HIIT makes you lose weight!

One of the best benefits of HIIT is that it leads to significant weight loss. A study published in Obesity Research and Clinical Practice looked at 11 different studies and concluded that HIIT was an effective method for weight loss. HIIT works so well for weight loss because it causes a large amount of calorie burn in just 20 minutes. In addition, the HIIT workouts were intense enough to cause a decrease in Appetite. Therefore, people who did these types of workouts lost weight without even trying.

A study in Obesity showed that obese men and women lost twice as much weight when they combined HIIT with dieting as those who just focused on dieting.

HIIT increases fat loss.

High-intensity interval training has been shown to reduce depression and anxiety, as well as increase fat loss.  In the American College of Sports Medicine’s Health & Fitness Journal, a study found that obese women who did an hour of cardio every day lost more belly fat by doing three 10-minute steady-state workouts instead. If you do not do well with long bouts of exercise, HIIT is perfect for you! Instead of spending hours at the gym, try doing shorter sessions with rest periods between the high-intensity parts.

A study found that overweight men who did HIIT three sessions per week for 12 weeks reduced abdominal fat by up to 13% without changing how many calories they ate or how active they were.

HIIT may reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease.

The American Heart Association recommends that all adults participate in 150 minutes of moderate-intensity aerobic activity every week. This includes walking briskly, biking, dancing aerobically, swimming, hiking, running, or playing tennis. New evidence shows that the same level of activity recommended by the heart association can lower the risk of cardiovascular disease if done in short bursts of high-intensity intervals.

HIIT can increase bone density.

High-intensity interval training is one of the most powerful ways to build strong bones. A recent study published in the British Medical Journal found that women who did three HIIT sessions per week for 12 weeks experienced a 6% increase in their bone mineral density. Other studies have shown similar results.

A study in Osteoporosis Research found that older adults who did HIIT three times per month for three months improved bone density in their hips and knees.

HIIT can make you happier.

How does HIIT affect your health ? It can make you happier

People who participated in a study in the Journal of Psychosomatic Obstetrics & Gynecology found that doing HIIT led to higher happiness levels than people who did low-intensity continuous exercise. Researchers believe that this is because high-intensity exercise raises dopamine levels in the brain. Dopamine is known to be associated with happiness.

HIIT boosts self-esteem.

A recent study published in the journal Appetite found that people who did high-intensity interval training felt more confident about themselves than those who did low-intensity continuous exercises. The researchers believe that HIIT helped participants feel more energetic and stronger.

HIIT can help you live longer.

A study in the journal Public Health Reports found that people who did regular HIIT had a 50% reduction in the risk of dying over eight years compared to people who did low-to-moderate intensity continuous exercise.

HIIT burns fat faster than traditional cardio.

A study in Diabetes Care found that people who did a combination of HIIT and strength training burned more fat than people who only did cardio. The researchers believe that the extra muscle mass used while doing HIIT contributed to the additional fat burning.

HIIT can help prevent diabetes.

A study in Diabetic Medicine found that people who did four rounds of 10-second sprints followed by five seconds rest could reduce their risk of developing type 2 diabetes by 43%. People who did high-intensity intermittent exercises three times per week also saw a 16% decrease in their risk for diabetes.

Also, people who did eight rounds of 2 minutes of fast-paced jogging followed by 1 minute of rest each round had better insulin sensitivity after just one month than people who did a slower-paced continuous workout.

HIIT builds lean muscle.

A study in Physiology & Behavior found that people who did HI IT increased their lean body mass by an average of 1.1 kg after 8 weeks. That’s the equivalent of increasing your height by 5 cm!

HIIT makes you less likely to get sick.

A study in The Journal of Sports Science & Coaching found that people who did 3 sets of 20 seconds of intense cycling followed by 10 seconds of light cycling every day got sick 4.5 days less often than people who did a moderate-intensity continuous exercise routine.

HIIT boosts your metabolism.

A study in Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism found that people who did two rounds of 30 seconds of intense exercise followed by one minute of rest every three minutes had a greater metabolic rate than people who did a slow walking pace of 45 minutes.

HIIT reduces stress.

Researchers have found that people who did six rounds of 12 seconds of fast-paced running followed by 12 seconds of rest had lower blood pressure than people who did a continuous moderate-intensity workout. They believe that this was because high-intensity exercise increases levels of endorphins in the brain. Endorphins are natural painkillers.

HIIT builds endurance.

A study in Human Performance found that people who did three rounds of 30 seconds of fast-paced running and then rested for 15 seconds experienced a significant increase in endurance capacity compared to people who did a continuous aerobic exercise.

HIIT can improve your mood.

A study in BMC Medical Education found that people who did an hour of HIIT three times per week for six months experienced fewer symptoms of depression than people who just watched TV or played video games.

HIIT can make you more productive.

A study in the Journal of Sports Sciences found that people who did a series of short bursts of high-intensity interval training felt significantly more alert and energetic than people who did a similar amount of low-intensity work.

HIIT burns calories even while you sleep.

A study in Frontiers in Neuroscience found that people who did 20 seconds of intense activity followed by 40 seconds of rest burned about 100 extra calories during sleep than people who just sat around doing nothing. This is because the act of exercising activates certain parts of the brain that control metabolism. It turns out that these same areas of the brain are responsible for regulating metabolism while we’re asleep.

HIIT can be used to treat cancer.

A study in Cancer Prevention Research found that people who did high-intensity interval training three times per week for 8 weeks experienced reduced tumor size and number.

HIIT can help you live longer.

A study in Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise found that people who did HIIT three days per week lived 7 years longer than people who did only moderate-intensity workouts.

HIIT can boost your sex drive.

A study in PLOS One found that men who did HIIT five times per week for 12 weeks experienced increased testosterone production and higher sexual desire than men who did moderate-intensity continuous workouts.

Recovery time is shorter!

Another benefit of HIIT is a faster recovery.

HIIT is an acronym for High-intensity interval training. It is a form of exercise that alternates between intense bursts of physical activity and rest periods or light exercise. HIIT has many health benefits, including reduced rates of depression and anxiety, faster fat loss, better sleep, improved mental health, and so much more!

You will become healthier!

One study showed that HIIT could help lower blood pressure. Another study showed that HIIT helps prevent heart disease. And a third study showed that HIIT improves insulin sensitivity and reduces inflammation.

You will burn calories all day!

The average person burns around 300 calories per hour while watching TV. By comparison, HIIT burns 500 calories an hour. So, if you watch TV for four hours straight, you would burn over 1,000 calories.

It is safer than running!

Running can cause injuries and stress fractures. However, HIIT doesn’t put too much strain on your body.

Risks associated with HIIT workout

Many people believe that HIIT can be done by everyone, at any time and anywhere. This is not true. HIIT workouts are a great way to lose weight and get in shape, but there are risks associated with them. If you’re going to be doing HIIT workout routines, make sure you take the necessary precautions.

Here are some risks associated with HIIT workout:

Injury

Injury is one of the Risks associated with HIIT workout

If you’re not working out correctly and/or if you overdo it and hurt yourself, then HIIT really isn’t worth anything. You could even make yourself worse off than before! So make sure your form is right, and only work out as hard as your body can handle without hurting yourself getting injured.

Health concerns

It’s not very healthy to do HIIT over a long period of time. There is only so much your body can handle, and you’ll end up wearing yourself out after a while. So if you’re going to do this type of workout, make sure that it doesn’t interfere with other important things in your life such as family, friends or work.

Intensity level

Even though HIIT workouts are meant to be high-intensity interval training, some people get carried away with the intensity of the exercise and actually put their bodies at risk for injury rather than benefit from it. These risks usually happen when someone starts doing HIIT routine without warming up first.

Doing a proper warm-up can help reduce these risks.

HIIT workouts are great for losing weight and getting in shape, but you must realize that it is not an excuse to get lazy.

There are still some things you need to take into consideration beforehand. Risks associated with HIIT workout might happen if you don’t do it correctly or if you push yourself too hard. So make sure your form is good and work at the intensity level that’s right for you.

Conclusion

It’s easy to incorporate a HIIT workout into your daily routine!

HIIT workouts can easily fit into your daily schedule. You don’t have to plan ahead. Just pick a few minutes at random times throughout the day when you feel like working out. For example, you might start off your day with a 5 minute HIIT workout. Or, you may want to do it before bedtime. Either way, this type of exercise is great for busy individuals.

If you’d rather not go through the hassle of planning out your own HIIT workout, there are several apps available online that will guide you through different types of HIIT routines. These apps are also useful for those who prefer to follow along with their favorite music.

Research has shown that HIIT is a great way to improve health and live a longer life. This type of exercise can help with many things, such as mental health, fat loss, sleep quality, and more! However, there are some risks associated with this type of workout. These include: overtraining (doing too much), injuries (such as stress fractures), and increased risk for depression or anxiety. These risks can be avoided by starting slow and building a healthy training habit.

Please follow and like us:
Pin Share